buzzfeed:

Squidward is too real.

"

Japan is well known for taking foreign products and ideas and adapting them to suit domestic taste, and Christmas is no exception. A highly commercialised and non-religious affair, lots of money is spent annually on decorations, dinners and gifts. KFC is arguably the biggest contributor, thanks in part to its advertising campaign.

“One of the reasons the campaign lasted so long is that the message is always the same: at Christmas you eat chicken,” said Yasuyuki Katagi, executive director at Ogilvy and Mather Japan, the advertising agency.

"

All Japan wants for Christmas is Kentucky Fried Chicken - FT.com (via iamdanw)

(via timoni)

How to Take Your Pet Everywhere

newyorker:

image

In this week’s issue, Patricia Marx reports on touring New York and Boston with five “un-cuddly” emotional-support animals

"Why did the turkey cross the road? To get to the Hampton Jitney. How did the twenty-six-pound fowl get across? With me hoisting him by his ‘Emotional Support Animal’ harness, as if he were a duffel bag."

Above: The author takes an alpaca to the drugstore. Photograph by Robin Siegel.

tyinteractive:

wow

liveeverything:

How to Avoid Feelings: a lesson by Pooh

(Source: shardwick, via zantywhite)

koreanmodel:

Han Euddeum by Cha Hyegyeong for Vogue Korea Oct 2014

koreanmodel:

Han Euddeum by Cha Hyegyeong for Vogue Korea Oct 2014

newyorker:

Today’s daily cartoon by David Sipress.

newyorker:

Today’s daily cartoon by David Sipress.

nprfreshair:

Talking about death isn’t easy, but mortician Caitlin Doughty is trying to reform how we think about the deaths of loved ones — and prepare for our own.
Her new book is Smoke Gets In Your Eyes & Other Lessons from the Crematory.
Here’s what she would like to see changed in cremation: 

"If I could see anything change it would be the level of involvement of the family in the death rituals. Because when I was working at the crematory, the most shocking thing to me wasn’t so much the decomposing bodies or the strange bodies that I saw, it really was that I was alone there. And I was sending all of these people off to their final disposition in the crematorium machine and there was no one there and it didn’t feel right because I didn’t know these people. And it was an honor and I took it very seriously.
But the time when families did come — and that’s called a “witness cremation,” which is something you can ask for at your local crematory or funeral home — when … the family was there and they sat with the body and they took the time and they pushed the button to send the body into the flames, it was an incredibly powerful experience because they took responsibility for that body. And they took responsibility for that death and for that loss to the community and that to me is the thing that we’ve lost and it’s most crucial that we get back.”

Mortician Talks Openly About Death, And Wants You To, Too
Photo: Getty/Darren McCollester 

nprfreshair:

Talking about death isn’t easy, but mortician Caitlin Doughty is trying to reform how we think about the deaths of loved ones — and prepare for our own.

Her new book is Smoke Gets In Your Eyes & Other Lessons from the Crematory.

Here’s what she would like to see changed in cremation: 

"If I could see anything change it would be the level of involvement of the family in the death rituals. Because when I was working at the crematory, the most shocking thing to me wasn’t so much the decomposing bodies or the strange bodies that I saw, it really was that I was alone there. And I was sending all of these people off to their final disposition in the crematorium machine and there was no one there and it didn’t feel right because I didn’t know these people. And it was an honor and I took it very seriously.

But the time when families did come — and that’s called a “witness cremation,” which is something you can ask for at your local crematory or funeral home — when … the family was there and they sat with the body and they took the time and they pushed the button to send the body into the flames, it was an incredibly powerful experience because they took responsibility for that body. And they took responsibility for that death and for that loss to the community and that to me is the thing that we’ve lost and it’s most crucial that we get back.”

Mortician Talks Openly About Death, And Wants You To, Too

Photo: Getty/Darren McCollester