tastefullyoffensive:

[maximoni]
fastcompany:

Texting While Walking? In China, There’s A Lane For That
Walk this way: A Chinese city has installed a special sidewalk lane for distracted walkers.
Read More>
(Photo: Barcroft Media via The Telegraph)

fastcompany:

Texting While Walking? In China, There’s A Lane For That

Walk this way: A Chinese city has installed a special sidewalk lane for distracted walkers.

Read More>

(Photo: Barcroft Media via The Telegraph)

laughingsquid:

Adorable Illustrations Made With Everyday Objects by Hyemi Jeong
yeezusquote:

My best friend say she use to fuck with Usher I don’t care what none of y’all say, I still love her - Kanye West

yeezusquote:

My best friend say she use to fuck with Usher I don’t care what none of y’all say, I still love her - Kanye West

(via lexxaduerre)

theclearlydope:

One Nation Under Groot.

theclearlydope:

One Nation Under Groot.

(via tastefullyoffensive)

skunkbear:

Here’s an interesting study: psychologists at the University of York wanted to investigate first impressions. They had people rate 1000 images of faces on different social traits (this person looks more approachable, that one looks less dominant) and also mapped “65 physical attributes, such as eyebrow width, mouth area, and cheekbone position” … even head angle!

Then, with some statistical analysis, they were able to show how different physical traits influence our first impressions. We obviously use physical cues to determine how attractive someone is, but according to the study those same cues influence what we think about their personalities.

These cartoon faces are based on the study - the researchers took their objective measurements of various facial features and optimized them for certain traits. Obviously we can’t control a lot about our faces, but the study does suggest that if you want to appear more approachable, smiling really big and tilting your head to the side (at a 10.21 degree angle to be precise) might help.

Source: Richard J. W. Vernon, Clare A. M. Sutherland, Andrew W. Young, and Tom Hartley, Department of Psychology, University of York

(via npr)